I’d Give My RIght Arm for a Tool That…

Veins in my Right Arm.
…is cross-platform and collaborative, and would allow me to assign my current “fantasy unit test” in history classes. That unit test would have students create a conversation from home featuring images and texts that is recorded and embeddable on their blogs — call it something like a recorded Skype conference + screencast.

I’d simply want small groups of students (individuals would be easy) to discuss the big events of the unit like the newly-educated budding subject area experts I’m trying to create — and to do so in a relaxed, informal, and audience-conscious way.

I picture that audience being their parents, and the “synopsis” of their “talk show” to be along these lines:

In today’s episode, the hosts talk about the often mind-bending beginnings of Chinese history, how radically different that history is from all other major civilizations’, and what those other civilizations might learn from China’s ancient beginnings that could still be useful in today’s world — with several detours for laughs along the way.

I picture the audience being maybe their parents, who might be curious to learn from their kids where their tuition dollars are going.

The problem? I don’t know a tool. My school allows Macs and PCs, and I don’t know how three or four students could do an online session with a shared desktop and screencast-recorder that also records conference calls.

Shareski? Ira? Beuhler?

 

 

5 thoughts on “I’d Give My RIght Arm for a Tool That…”

  1. I see where you are headed…  and I don’t have a slick answer. To do this: “something like a recorded Skype conference + screencast,” I think I have a roundabout way to get there. Perhaps. Anyway…

    I see this: “relaxed, informal, and audience-conscious way” and this: “shared desktop and screencast-recorder that also records conference calls.”

    I’m not sure exactly what you’re envisioning. However, if I had to do this tomorrow, I think I’d be empowered by your quest for informal. I also think I know how I’d attempt to go about it.

    I think the screencasting tools in Quicktime allow for more possibility than most people realize. Yes, I’m goofy, but here was a quick and dirty shot at showing some of the screen elements that most people don’t think about when screencasting: http://sjsd.schoolwires.net//cms/lib3/MO01001773/Centricity/Domain/542/What is Screencasting.mov (it’s a very slow load for sure). If not, you can find it referenced here: http://www.sjsd.k12.mo.us/seannash

    Of course, the text elements could be simply added in-line on the blog, since you mentioned that is a place where it might ultimately be referenced. And the “screencast recorder that records conference calls”…  could you not do a Google Hangout…  all the while recording the event as a screencast in Quicktime.

    Or maybe not. I’m not sure.  Good to “hear” from you. It’s been too long…

    Sean

    1. Nice to hear from you Sean, and thanks for the possible ninja moves. I’ll explore. Never used Google hangout before. I’ll follow up with the results when the world stops to give me time to experiment :P

      Take care!

    2. Nice to hear from you Sean, and thanks for the possible ninja moves. I’ll explore. Never used Google hangout before. I’ll follow up with the results when the world stops to give me time to experiment :P

      Take care!

  2. I’d look at Google Hangouts. You can record them using a variety of tools, but here’s a post where I describe using a specific tool to record the screen. See http://davidwees.com/content/recording-google-hangouts

See more? Say more...